Hidden treasures discovered while digging through Frank Moore's huge archives.

Category: Writings (page 1 of 7)

Expansions & Contractions

From Cherotic Magic Revised, Chapter 2: Chero (Section 7) by Frank Moore, first published in 1990:


The expansions and contractions are the natural cycles of growth. They are life breathing. Each cycle is different in length, depending on what is happening in the life.

Both the expansion and the contraction phases have their own dangers of illusions. In expansions, things open up and become easy. Opportunities and people are attracted to the student by the chero. When this happens, the student is tempted to throw away her framework, or to go outside of it, to pursue, to run after these opportunities and people. If she does this, she loses both her base and what attracted these things to her in the first place. She finds herself out of power.

Another common reaction to expansions is to think one is not worthy enough, not able or strong enough to handle all of the good that life suddenly offers her. Such a person destroys the expansion, her framework, and sometimes even herself to avoid having her “unworthiness” be found out, to avoid the responsibilities that being happy and creating a full life bring. This reaction is more widespread than one might think. The student usually has little problem accepting criticism from the teacher. But when the teacher starts talking about the student’s strengths, abilities, and potentials, the student very often forgets her pact of trust, and starts arguing with the teacher. This is because if the student accepts her worthiness, her strengths, abilities and potentials, she is admitting her responsibility for creating her life and reality, and the effect she has on others. The student should trust the teacher even when the teacher is praising her, although this praise may be rare.

In contractions, the student faces a different set of illusions. In contractions, everything seems, appears to be falling apart. What the person thought would be a direct path to what she wants falls apart. People start flaking out on her, leaving her. Things get hard and difficult. Things seem to stop happening for her. Her life sphere gets small. The pace of living becomes slow.

Most people panic in contractions. They feel trapped, penned in. They feel like they are losing everything, going backward, dying as who they thought they were. When this happens, they grab onto things and people to save themselves and to get what they want; or they give up, thinking they are not strong or worthy enough to get to all possibilities. They usually tell themselves they really do not want all possibilities, they really want less. They lie to themselves to make their settling for less more livable.

In reality, contractions are periods in which the old phase is being rearranged to prepare for the new expansion that is coming. Some old stuff has to be burnt away to make ready for the new. Some valuable stuff is stored away to be used later. This feels like losing. This loss is not real. The creative progress in contractions is far too complex for us to rationally, logically understand or try to rationally plan out. Evolution is an automatic process when you let go into it. When you know that after every expansion comes a contraction, you will be less tempted to break out of your framework to pursue some glamorous or exciting avenues that appear to be more direct routes to what you want. You can be sure they are not.

When you know that after every contraction comes an expansion, you can better practice active passivity, which is the key to using contractions as a quiet building of creative potential. In this way, in both expansions and contractions, you can maintain the even focus that puts you in control of your reality. By knowing the cycles of expansions and contractions are irregular, you can relax, not holding on to anything, but not waiting in dread for the next contraction to hit. This is one of the aspects of erour, the vulnerable power.

Art by LaBash from Cherotic Magic Revised

Notes on “Season of Hidden Hope”

Frank originally wrote the poem “Season of Hidden Hope – a radio musical” for his appearance on Barb Golden’s KPFA radio show, Crack O’ Dawn on December 2, 1993.

Here is the original script with the poem and songs that Frank would sing as part of the reading of the poem:

Walking along cold dark homeless roads clogged with ice fears my only friend is the wind chilling my bones into longing and lost and beyond… into a cynical loneliness. Herding my sheep, looking in windows of unattainable desires, looking at presents useless because I don’t have anyone to give them to, looking into the past soft colored warm homes that are no longer mine. Everyone has left, everyone is gone. Even the sun has left long ago, long before the manger. And the sun will not come back ever again. This is the season of dark depression and fragile suicide. Yes, I know I can always bum up the $29.95 to buy the plastic hope and faith at 7 Eleven and pretend it is my wonderful life playing in the video store’s window. But instead I wrap myself in a jaded pretense of dry ice isolation of not caring, and drinking the stale but warm wine of regrets.

1. Meatloaf’s “2 out of 3”
2. Dodie Steven’s “Merry, Merry Christmas Baby”
3. Elvis’ “Blue Christmas”

The birth of new hope has always been hidden within the long cold winter darkness. Huddle together, clinging to our tribal warmth as our only protection against dying into the scary black unknown, we always have been blind to the evergreen hope of life. It has always been the first time the sun and easy hope have gone away. So we always think they will never come again. The evergreen hope has been hidden away in the womb of the humble and in children’s dreams. The forces of greys have always overheard the possibility of the hidden hope…have always searched for it to pervert it into human isolation…or, failing that, to kill it for all time. But the forces of power always overlook the hidden human hope rocking in the baby’s cradle. As power goes on a desperate killing, chopping hacking gorging, eating the old world up……we huddle together in the silent night upon the hill, rocking together in our tribal body warmth. The shaman, the holy woman, the medicine man have always shifted our attention away from the dark cold outward fear, have always shifted our gaze to the guiding light of new birth…at first in the stars, then in the roaring tribal fire which pulled all human feelings within it, and still later into that corny home hearth crackling with bright colors popping. Into this fire we have always gone, hearing the drumming of our innocent heart beating in a slow excitement, meeting again our love of life. We curl up with our love and wait for warm spring to arrive…as hope grows into knowing.

4. Elvis’ “Silent Night”
5. Johnny Mathis’ “Do You Hear What I Hear?”
6. Bing Crosby’s “Little Drummer Boy”
7. N.K. Cole’s “O Holy Night”
8. John Lennon’s ”Happy Xmas (War is Over)”


Scan of Frank’s original script

Here is the recording of the reading of the poem from the show:


Below is the front and back of the postcard that was mailed out to Frank’s mailing list (snail mail at that time!) promoting the show:

Photos from the postcard “photoshoot”:


Here is the complete Crack O’ Dawn show from December 2, 1993:


Christmas 1993: Frank, Linda, Mikee and Kittee.

Carlos

In the early days of people being diagnosed with AIDS, one of Frank’s students, Carlos, got the AIDS diagnosis. Frank told him his job now was to bring death into life and to live and die joyfully. Carlos followed Frank in this and was a joy and inspiration to all of us around him.

Frank believed in type casting. After Carlos found out that he had AIDS, Frank cast him as the “dying man” in his performances. At the 5+ hour ritual performances Frank had nude, body painted Carlos wearing his “I have AIDS” sign around his neck inside of a small tent. Each audience member was led into the tent before entering the performance space and Carlos talked to them briefly about death, that it is not something to fear, that it is not painful in itself, it is part of life. When Carlos passed away he was in a very peaceful, joyful state of mind. When we got the word that Carlos had passed we looked at each other and said let’s have ice cream sundaes!! (Eating ice cream was one of the indulgences Carlos allowed himself with Frank’s encouragement, as part of his dying process.)

Carlos, street performance at The Lab, San Francisco, 1988. Photo by Linda Mac.

Below is a transcription of an excerpt of a conversation recorded December 10, 1995 at Father George’s house in San Francisco. Frank Moore, Linda Mac, Mikee LaBash, Corey Nicholl, Father George, and Louise Scott were present. (Father George was a friend of Frank’s during his time in Santa Fe, New Mexico when Frank lived with Louise Scott and her family.)

Linda:  What, the house?  No, Carlos?  Um, one of Frank’s students, Carlos, died of AIDS-related stuff.  And he’d been working with Frank for a few years when he found out that he had AIDS.  And Frank said, “O.k., your job is to die as lustfully as you’ve lived, and to bring death into life.”  ‘Cause it was a whole group of us that were part of like the community that were working with Frank, and doing performances and stuff too.  And so, well he did fine for a long time …

Frank:  I …

Linda:  … You cast him, Frank cast him as the dying man in performances, after he found that out.  And so people, it was in the all-night ritual performances, people are lead in by nude body-painted dancers, and it’s like all very ritualistic and quiet, and there’s body music playing.  And they would be lead to this little kind-of cave made out of back-drops, and Carlos would be in there, nude and body-painted with a sign that says he’s the Dying Man.  And it would be like two people at a time, and they’d be left in the room with him for like a minute or two, and he’d give them a rap about death.  And he said, that death is not painful in itself.  And it’s not something to be feared, that it’s just a transition.  And then they’d be lead out.  And most people actually didn’t realize that …

Louise:  … that he really was.

George:  … that he was really dying.

Linda:  … the dying man.  And …

George:  Did he do it when he was really sick?  I mean, did he continue doing it?

Linda:  Yeah.  Yeah.  Yeah.  Oh yeah, right up to the time he died.  And at the point where his body really started to go … he was like really fine up until that point.  And then, he moved upstairs with a couple that had been his friends, so they could take more care of him.  And they called us, and they said, they called us one afternoon and they said, “We’re worried about Carlos because he won’t get out of bed and he won’t eat.”  And we had a tour coming up to Portland that Carlos was planning on going on with us.  And so, Frank gets in the car, we drive over to San Francisco.  Carlos is lying in bed, doing this Camille thing, you know, that was his like picture of himself dying. (all laughing)  And Frank said, “Look, you have to look and see if you’re dying or not.  If you’re dying, tell us, and we’ll help you die.  If you’re not dying, (Frank screams), you have to eat, you have to start having fun with us.  Eating, you have to be in shape  to go to Portland.”  And he said, “Take the night to think about it, and tell me in the morning.”  And he said, he told Carlos that people are afraid to push him because they’re afraid that he’s gonna die if they push him.  And he said, “I don’t care if you die, because it’s better to die than to live and be a wimp.”  And so, you know … and next morning they call us and they said, “I don’t know what you did, but not only is he eating but he insisted on getting up at the table.”  (George laughs)

And it kind of went up and down for a while.  We started going to his house for sessions ’cause he was too sick to come to meet with Frank.  And Frank had everybody …

Frank:  He came to …

Linda:  Oh, an all-night thing?  Yeah.  He had never gone to one of the twenty-four hour, like Frank does these twenty-four hour like workshop type things …

George:  Carlos had never gone?

Linda:  … and Carlos had never done one of them, and he really wanted to.  So we had one scheduled, and he was in the hospital, and he got out like the night before, he was in and out of the hospital a lot.  So he shows up with like, it was like a portable hospital room … Well he was late.  O.k., so … when he had first started meeting with Frank years before, he was late for everything.  And that was one of the first things that Frank said had to go.  You know, “you have to be on time anytime you say you’re gonna be some place.”  So he was always on time then.  And now, here he is, like really sick, depending on other people, and he’s like a couple hours late for this thing.  And so, while we’re waiting for him to come … a lot of the people that were in the workshop had never, didn’t know any of us.  They were just doing this workshop they had signed up with to do with Frank.  So Frank said, “Well I have someone coming who’s gonna be playing the part of a dying man.”  And he starts giving this whole rap about how he’s gonna pretend he’s dying of AIDS, and he’s going to da da da da …  And so Carlos shows up then two hours later with his entourage of like he’s on oxygen, he has all these medications for his skin and all this stuff.  And he’s in tears.  He’s so upset ’cause he’s late.  And he comes in, “Frank!”  You know, and he’s like … and Frank, you know, lets him talk for a minute, and  he turns to everybody, he says, “This is him.  See?” 

And Carlos is looking, and Frank said, “I told them that you’re playing the part of the dying man.”  And Carlos just looks at Frank and goes, “O.k., Frank!”  You know … (all laugh)  And Frank had set it up so that he could set his own pace, ’cause we didn’t know like what he’d be up for.  And he said, just join in as much as you want.  And by the end of it, he was off oxygen.  He like was totally, you know, back into everything and he was involved in everything, through the whole thing.  He didn’t like take a break at any point.  And he said that it, you know, he felt a lot better at the end of it.  And the process of him, he would kind of go in and out of being o.k. …

George:  Yeah.  That happens pretty regularly.

Linda:  Yeah.  At one point when we were over there, he told Frank that Frank didn’t know what it was like to have to depend on people for your every need.  (all explode screaming/laughing)  Which he denied saying.  He said, “Frank, you made that up.  I never said that.”  The thing would be, Frank had, you know, everybody that was part of this little community, somebody was with him all the time, and they’d just hang out with him, or play cards or just whatever, you know.  And he would be this, (plays Camille) like “Ohhh … you knowww … I’m in soooo …”  Like that.  And then we’d get a card game going.  Boom.  He’s sharp, he’s fine, nothing hurts, he’s winning.  (all laugh)  You know, and so … that was like during his period when he’s going in and out of things.  One time he’s in the hospital and the Portland trip is approaching and Frank had told him he has to be able to walk, you know, to go on this tour.  And, we get there and it turns out, he’s not walking.  He’s not getting out of bed, he’s not moving.

George:  He’s in the hospital at this point.

Linda:  Yeah, he’s in the hospital, this is one of those like three or four day things, and then he’d be in and out for different things.  And, Frank said, “O.k., I told you you should be walking.  I want you to lean on Michael,” and another guy that was with us, Rourke, “and walk as far as the door and back to your bed.”  And he says, “Well I’m not gonna lean on anybody then.  I’m just gonna walk.”  He gets to the door, and the door is open.  He waits ’til he gets to the frame so that he’s in view of the nurse’s station, and GRABS onto the frame, trying to get Frank in trouble!

And Frank just yells at him, and says, “I told you to lean on Michael and Rourke.  Now you lean on them to get back to bed.”  And that all happens, and he goes through this trauma over that, and we play cards, he’s fine, you know.  And we’re leaving and the nurse calls us over and she said, “What did you do to get him to walk?”  It turns out that they’d been trying to get him to walk.  He said he needed a physical therapist.  They brought a physical therapist.  The physical therapist said, “You should be able to walk.”

“Oh no, I need a doctor.”  They bring a doctor:  “You should be able to walk.”  No, he can’t walk.  And then they see him walking, you know.  And so Frank said, “Well, not only that.  He’s supposed to walk a step more each day.”  The nurse said, “Fine, I’ll enforce that.”  (all laugh) 

So by the time he died …

George:  You should have billed him.  (all laugh)

Frank:  Uh huh!

Linda:  You did!  Oh yeah, he paid.  He paid all the way to the end.  By the time he died he was pretty consistently at peace with it, and a pretty jolly soul with it all.  It was very neat, and … so it actually felt, you know, it wasn’t as drastic a thing when he died, ’cause he was so kinda right there with us.  Yeah.

Frank:  We ate …

Linda:  Right.  The day he died, we decided … you know, his whole thing when he was dying was that, his fantasy had been having ice cream or something, something like that.  And Frank said, “Pffft, you know, you’re dying, have as much ice cream as you want.”  So he used to have the people he was staying with make him milkshakes, so he could get up in the middle of the night and drink a milkshake if he wanted it.  So, the day that he died, we’re sitting there, and we said, “Well, let’s have a sundae.”  You know, so that started like a ritual.  So on his birthday and on his death day we go out and we have these decadent sundaes, and it never makes us sick, you know …

George:  (laughing)  Banana splits …

Louise:  Right, you just do it.

Linda:  … if we did that on any other day, it would be like “Ooohhh.”  You know, but we do that …

George:  Oh jeez …  People do dance around dying, though.  We’ve certainly, we have people who come this close, you think they’re gonna be gone in two hours, and then they back away.  And then … for another couple months, and approach it again, and back away.  Just never know …

Linda:  Yeah.

George:  … but we’ve never had anyone eating ice cream on the way out.  (laughs)

Frank:  Carlos was joking …

Linda:  … with the nurse, as he died.  Right.  He was getting a transfusion, and he was joking with the nurse, and he just passed.

George:  He was getting, what, how did, did he have cardiac arrest, you know, was that the thing …?

Linda:  I guess that was it.  Did he have cardiac arrest as he was having the transfusion?  (Frank – yes)  Yeah.  Yeah.

The Lab, San Francisco, 1988.
“Journey to Lila”, EZTV, Los Angeles, California, 1988.
“Wrapping/Rocking” at Poetry Bash, Fort Mason Center, San Francisco, 1988.
Poetry Bash, Fort Mason Center, San Francisco, 1988.
“Journey to Lila”, ATA, San Francisco, California, April 8, 1988. Photo by Linda Mac.

This is the text that displayed in the “Dying Man” tent along with a large photo of Carlos wearing his “I have AIDS” sign at performances after Carlos died:

I AM CARLOS. FOR THE LAST YEAR, MY ROLE IN THESE DREAMS HAS BEEN TO GREET THE PEOPLE, AND TO PREPARE THEM FOR THEIR DEATH WHICH THEY (AND YOU) WILL EXPERIENCE IN THIS DREAM. I TOLD THEM THAT DEATH IS NOT SOMETHING TO BE FEARED, SOMETHING THAT IN ITSELF IS NOT PAINFUL. I TOLD THEM, IN MY MARVELOUS VINCENT PRICE VOICE, THAT DEATH IS A PART OF LIFE TO BE LUSTFULLY RELISHED AND ENJOYED.

I WISH YOU COULD HAVE HEARD MY VINCENT PRICE. I TRIED TO GET HERE IN MY BODY, WHICH WAS FINALLY FITTING THE BODY OF THE DYING MAN. I EVEN FANTASIZED ABOUT DYING HERE WHILE I WAS TALKING TO YOU ABOUT DEATH. BUT THAT WAS NOT TO BE. 2:35 P.M., JANUARY 30, 1989, MY HEART STOPPED. BUT I AM HERE WITH YOU BECAUSE LIFE, WHICH DEATH IS A PART OF, GOES ON.

WHEN I FOUND OUT A YEAR AGO I HAD AIDS, THE KNOWING I WAS DYING LIBERATED ME SO THAT I COULD LIVE MORE FULLY, MORE HAPPILY, MORE OPENLY, MORE PEACEFULLY THEN I EVER LIVED BEFORE. FRANK, ALWAYS A BELIEVER IN TYPE-CASTING, CREATED FOR ME THE DYING MAN ROLE TO SPREAD THE LIBERATION TO PEOPLE WHOSE DEATHS ARE NOT IN SIGHT. A LOT OF PEOPLE THOUGHT THE “I HAVE AIDS” SIGN I WORE AROUND MY NECK AND THE DYING MAN WERE FICTIONS OF THE ART. BUT WHEN THEY DISCOVERED THAT I WAS REALLY DYING, THE DREAM BROKE OUT OF ART, AND INTO THE REALITY OF EVERYDAY. I HOPE BY MY BEING WITH YOU IN THIS WAY IT WILL SPREAD THE LIBERATION TO YOU.

The sign that appeared outside of the “Dying Man” tent (painted by LaBash).

Videos with Carlos

EZTV – Wrapping/Rocking & Statues
Los Angeles, California, September 9, 1988.

Playing with Reality
(in two parts)
Berkeley, California, November 19 & 20 1988

The Outrageous Horror Show
Berkeley Square, Berkeley, California, October 29, 1988

Censorship Address to the Berkeley City Council

Written September 8, 2002.

City Council member Kris Worthington, Frank Moore and Dr. Susan Block

Hi. I am Frank Moore, the producer/host of the targeted UNLIMITED POSSIBILITIES and the sponsor of the targeted SUSAN BLOCK SHOW. It is interesting that this proposed ordinance is designed to target shows by an uppity crip and a smart sexy woman…or is it a smart sexy crip and an uppity woman? My show is politically, culturally, and artistically radical, offering in-depth conversations about issues that affect us all with a wide range of people, live music, and cutting-edge performances, films, and art. We throw everything in this stew for social change, explore everything, including eroticism, to find alternatives. This is what got me targeted by Sen. Jesse Helms in the early ’90s. And this is why our shows are being targeted now. A few people, including some on the City Council, want to sweep these alternatives from public access because they are threatened by these alternatives.

Councilmember Betty Olds, who introduced this ordinance, has publicly proclaimed that if she had her way, she would ban these alternatives from our public access channel. She bemoaned the fact that it is illegal to censor or ban community shows on public access channels. This ordinance is an attempt to get around this legal fact. Olds actually has said she would take away B-TV, the channel of the community, if that was the only way she could force the removal of the shows that she doesn’t approve of. So the real targets and victims of this ordinance are not our two shows, but the people of Berkeley, their freedom of expression on their channel.

This ordinance came about when both the staff of B-TV and the board of BCM refused to adopt a censoring scheduling policy, following their mission of promoting free speech and diversity. They knew getting some complaints is always a part of running a free speech channel. All of us producers were acting responsibly, requesting that our shows be aired after 10pm, the standard “safe harbor” for adult content. But the City Council, fueled by very few complaints, decided to ignore B-TV’s staff and producers and the BCM board. It decided to issue rules controlling what could be shown on B-TV when. When politicians do this, it should always set off loud alarm bells.

This ordinance is a dangerous product of this misguided adventure. It purports to protect children from “indecent” programs. It doesn’t do this. Again Olds has admitted that protecting children is just an excuse to get rid of shows that she and people like her find unsettling, etc.. This ordinance does not provide cheap hardware to concerned parents that allow them to block any program they deem unfit for their kids. Instead, it does away with the “safe harbor” of the 10pm-6am timeslot for adult programming. In its place there will be an “indecent” timeslot of midnight to 6am. Except for the shows which fall into a very narrow definition of what “indecent” is as defined in this ordinance, all other shows can be shown anytime! As Councilmembers Spring and Maio pointed out as they voted against the ordinance, the two targeted shows are not indecent. In fact, B-TV doesn’t have any shows that are indecent as defined in this ordinance.

In reality, this ordinance is not about protecting children at all. It is about chilling free speech. It is about forcing people to do “acceptable” shows. Under this ordinance, a producer is expected to label her show as indecent or not. If she doesn’t label it as indecent and somebody complains, there is a hearing. This hearing, its process, its rules, etc. are not remotely spelled out in the ordinance. If the show is found “indecent” in the hearing, the show is exiled to after midnight. But if the show is found not to be indecent…well, the complainer can do it again next week…until the producer is ground down into watering down her program. This is the real goal of this ordinance, not protecting kids!

Well, Suzy and I are not chillers. We do not chill. We boil. If this ordinance passes, we will fight lustfully! And we will win. We have to because, as Kriss Worthington keeps pointing out, this would give this and other city councils the power to control what we do and say on OUR public access channels…and freedom of speech dies!

By the way, are we going to let them limit our possibilities?

The complete archive of the censorship battle is here:
https://www.eroplay.com/fmup/archive/censorship.html


This piece was published in
Frankly Speaking: A Collection of Essays, Writings & Rants.

Gestures

Gestures was a ritual that Frank developed during his three year performance series at University of California, Berkeley in the 1980s and that he continued to use as a module in many of his performances for the next 30 years.

It is based upon the book MANWATCHING by Desmond Morris. During the ritual, those who choose to participate are paired, then strips of paper are drawn randomly from two bags and read aloud; one bag filled with the gestures (the complete list is below), one bag filled with adjectives.

The Gestures bags
Adjective and gesture strips.

Here is the introduction to the ritual that was read during a performance:

A Chanter sings:

“This is a ritual, a magical ritual, a ritual of Gestures which will open up a physical, magical force within those who choose to participate. At times the ritual will be very silly. At other times there will be a raw vulnerability, an intimacy that is not limited by social taboos, not framed in by romance or sex.”

“This magical ritual operates on the random principle. Magicians and mystics have used the factor of change throughout the ages to get past the rational, the logical, the linear, to get to inner knowledge or to universal wisdom. Shuffling the tarot cards and the throwing of the yarrow sticks for the i ching are but two examples of this random principle. In this ritual, the random principle, pulling gestures out of the box, will direct the ritual. Some gestures are silly. Some gestures are intense and intimate. The random principle makes each gesture equal. The random principle will remove the linear limiting taboo, sexual, romance context.”

“Linda will now pair people … to do the gestures.

The Chanter waits until Linda finishes pairing. Then the Chanter sings:

“Slowness is important in the quiet gentle sounds and laughter will help the magic. Watchers should refrain from talking during the ritual.”

“Each gesture has a special time length. You should keep doing one action until Linda sings the next gesture.”

“You will start releasing the physical force of eroplay in your bodies. This ritual will take eroplay out of social, moral, sexual, and romantic contexts, so that the focus will be on the pure magical fun and pleasure. It is important that each act be done gently, slowly, softly, completely.”

The Chanter quietly exits. Linda takes over.

“Gestures”, U.C.B. Series, Spring 1985. Photo by Mary Sullivan.

Here is the complete list of gestures:

HUNCH YOUR SHOULDERS

PUT YOUR HANDS OUT PALMS UP

TILT YOUR HEAD TO ONE SIDE

LOWER THE CORNERS OF YOUR MOUTH

RAISE YOUR EYEBROWS

HUG YOUR LEGS

CROSS YOUR LEGS

CROSS YOUR LEGS

CROSS YOUR LEGS

CLASP YOUR HANDS ON YOUR THIGHS

OPEN YOUR EYES WIDE

OPEN YOUR LEGS WIDE

OPEN YOUR LEGS WIDE

OPEN YOUR LEGS WIDE

OPEN YOUR LEGS WIDE

SHAKE YOUR WHOLE BODY

SHAKE YOUR WHOLE BODY

OPEN YOUR LEGS WIDE

OPEN YOUR LEGS WIDE

WAVE

SMILE

LIFT YOUR EYEBROWS UP

BLOW A KISS

SHAKE HANDS. Focus on having all touching and exchanges be deep, gentle, firm, self-confident, and fun.

SPREAD YOUR ARMS AS IF YOU ARE GOING TO HUG

LOOK AT ONE ANOTHER, VISUALLY EXPLORE ONE ANOTHER, PASS TABOOS

RUB ONE ANOTHER’S BACKS

RUB ONE ANOTHER’S RIBS

PUT YOUR ARMS AROUND ONE ANOTHER’S SHOULDERS

MAKE BRIEF EYE CONTACT WITH THE OTHER, THEN JERK AWAY

HOLD HANDS

RUB EACH OTHER’S HANDS. Feel the gentle warming pleasure

EXPLORE EACH OTHER’S HANDS. Feel the gentle warming pleasure

HOLD HANDS. We have started releasing a physical force in our bodies, EROPLAY. We feel this EROPLAY now as we hold hands. This ritual will take EROPLAY out of social, moral, sexual, and romantic contexts, so that the focus will be on the pure magical fun and pleasure. It is important that each act be done gently, slowly, softly, completely.

RUB NOSES

RUB ONE ANOTHER’S BARE ARMS.

RUB FORHEADS

RUB EACH OTHER’S HEAD, HEAD TO HEAD. Turn on each other’s scalps. Make one another feel like a puppy having its belly rubbed.

RUB ONE ANOTHER’S SHOULDERS

RUB ONE ANOTHER’S BARE ARMS, ARMS ON ARMS.

RUB FORHEADS, FORHEAD TO FORHEAD

RUB EACH OTHER’S HEAD, HEAD TO HEAD. Turn on each other’s scalps. Make one another feel like a puppy having its belly rubbed.

RUB ONE ANOTHER’S SHOULDERS

RUB ONE ANOTHER’S ARMPITS GENTLY

RUB CHEEKS, CHEEK TO CHEEK

LOOK DEEPLY INTO ONE ANOTHER’S EYES

RUB ONE ANTHER’S FEET. Turn them on to an intense warm glow of relaxing pleasure.

STICK YOUR TONGUE BARELY OUT, CURL IT UP AND MOVE IT

HUG ONE ANOTHER…AND ROCK BACK AND FORTH GENTLY. Rock out of any fear or taboos…rock back to primative humaness of being one with another by physical contact

STICK YOUR TONGUE BARELY OUT, CURL IT UP AND MOVE IT

HUG ONE ANOTHER…AND ROCK BACK AND FORTH GENTLY. Rock out of any fear or taboos…rock back to primative humaness of being one with another by physical contact

STICK YOUR TONGUE BARELY OUT, CURL IT UP AND MOVE IT

HUG ONE ANOTHER…AND ROCK BACK AND FORTH GENTLY. Rock out of any fear or taboos…rock back to primative humaness of being one with another by physical contact

STICK YOUR TONGUE BARELY OUT, CURL IT UP AND MOVE IT

HUG ONE ANOTHER…AND ROCK BACK AND FORTH GENTLY. Rock out of any fear or taboos…rock back to primative humaness of being one with another by physical contact

CURL UP, HUG YOURSELF, AND GENTLY ROCK BACK AND FORTH. Rock into comforting trust

JERK YOUR HEAD VERY SLIGHTLY

SHOW EACH OTHER YOUR BARE BELLY AND RUB YOUR BELLY

RUB ONE ANOTHER’S BARE BELLY LIKE A PUPPY’S BELLY, SOOTHINGLY

RUB BELLIES, BELLLY TO BELLY

EXPLORE ONE ANOTHER’S BELLY

HUG ONE ANOTHER

SQUEEZE ONE ANOTHER’S HANDS

SHOW YOUR BARE CALVES TO THE OTHER

RUB ONE ANOTHER’S CALVES

EXPLORE ONE ANOTHER’S CALVES

RUB ONE ANOTHER’S CALVES, CALVES TO CALVES

RUB ONE ANOTHER, ALL OVER

RUB HEADS, HEAD TO HEAD

STROKE ONE ANOTHER’S HAIR

RAISE YOUR HANDS ABOVE YOUR HEAD AS HIGH AS THEY WILL GO

PUT YOUR HANDS ON YOUR GENITALS

RUB ONE ANOTHER’S BACK

EXPLORE ONE ANOTHER’S BACK

LOOK AT ONE ANOTHER

PUT YOUR HANDS ON ONE ANOTHER’S GENITALS

RUB ONE ANOTHER’S SHOULDERS AND NECK

RUB ONE ANOTHER’S CHEST

RUB ONE ANOTHER’S BREASTS

RUB ONE ANOTHER’S CHEST, CHEST TO CHEST

RUB ONE ANOTHER’S BREASTS, BREASTS TO BREASTS

EXPLORE ONE ANOTHER’S CHEST

EXPLORE ONE ANOTHER’S BREASTS

EXPLORE EACH OTHER BY USING EVERY PART OF YOUR BODY

RUB BODIES

INTERTWINE YOUR BODIES AND SLOWLY MOVE TOGETHER

ONE LAY UPON THE OTHER AND MOVE IN SLOW MOTION

EXPLORE ONE ANOTHER’S BODY BY USING EVERY PART OF YOUR BODY

RUB BODIES

INTERTWINE YOUR BODIES AND SLOWLY MOVE TOGETHER

ONE LAY UPON THE OTHER AND MOVE IN SLOW MOTION

EXPLORE ONE ANOTHER’S BODY BY USING EVERY PART OF YOUR BODY

RUB BODIES

INTERTWINE YOUR BODIES AND SLOWLY MOVE TOGETHER

ONE LAY UPON THE OTHER AND MOVE IN SLOW MOTION

EXPLORE ONE ANOTHER’S BODY BY USING EVERY PART OF YOUR BODY

RUB BODIES

INTERTWINE YOUR BODIES AND SLOWLY MOVE TOGETHER

ONE LAY UPON THE OTHER AND MOVE IN SLOW MOTION

RUB YOUR GENITALS FOR BODY COMFORT

EXPLORE YOUR GENITALS FOR BODY COMFORT

PUT THE OTHER’S HAND ON YOUR GENITALS AND GUIDE IT SENSUALLY

RUB EACH OTHER’S GENITALS, NOT FOR SEXUAL REASONS, BUT FOR BODY COMFORT

HUG ONE ANOTHER…AND ROCK TOGETHER

RUB ONE ANOTHER’S BACK

LOOK AT ONE ANOTHER

RUB ONE ANOTHER’S SHOULDERS AND NECK

RUB ONE ANOTHER’S CHEST

RUB ONE ANOTHER’S BREASTS

PUT YOUR HEAD ON THE OTHER PERSON’S SHOULDER. HUG AND ROCK TOGETHER

RUB FACES

RUB FACES, FACE ON FACE

EXPLORE FACES

STICK YOUR TONGUE WAY OUT

LICK ONE ANOTHER’S EAR

RUB ONE ANOTHER’S KNEES

RUB ONE ANOTHER’S THIGHS

RUB ONE ANOTHER’S KNEES, KNEES TO KNEES

RUB ONE ANOTHER’S THIGHS, THIGHS ON THIGHS

EXPLORE ONE ANOTHER’S KNEES

EXPLORE ONE ANOTHER’S THIGHS

HOLD ONE ANOTHER’S WAIST

EXPLORE ONE ANOTHER’S BUTTS

RUB ONE ANOTHER’S BUTTS

RUB ONE ANOTHER’S BUTTS, BUTT TO BUTT

RUB YOUR GENITALS FOR BODY COMFORT

PUT THE OTHER’S HAND ON YOUR GENITALS, GUIDE IT EXPLORINGLY. RUB EACH OTHER’S GENITALS FOR BODY COMFORT, CALMING AND RELAXING

RUB ANYWHERE ON ONE ANOTHER’S BODY

EXPLORE EACH OTHER BY USING EVERY PART OF YOUR BODY

RUB BODIES

INTERTWINE YOUR BODIES AND SLOWLY MOVE TOGETHER

ONE LAY UPON THE OTHER AND MOVE IN SLOW MOTION

RUB YOUR GENITALS FOR BODY COMFORT

RUB EACH OTHER’S GENITALS FOR BODY COMFORT

IN VERY SLOW MOTION, RUB YOUR BODIES TOGETHER AND TALK TOGETHER


Gestures at University of California, Berkeley, July 24, 1986

BOUNDARIES KILL

by Frank Moore, January 29, 2002

Boundaries, borders
Are lies of power
They keep people in
They keep people out
They ain’t really there
Only in the sight
Of guard guns and dogs
The lines just ain’t there
You can just keep on walking
Toward me,
Into me

You could keep on walking
Except for their bullets of fear
Define and maintain your boundaries,
They tell us!

That keeps us weak and isolated
That keeps me from you,
Boxed up, bottled up
That keeps the wrong people out
Us protected in abstractions
That keeps our human spirit divided
Keeps Life separate from us
Keeps us warring, scared, hating
Keeps you from me
Keeps us hungry, thirsty, cold
Just owning
Instead of living deep and free.

Skin is not a border
Skin is a sea flowing everywhere
Touching, feeling, unlimited,
Breathing deeply
Giving, taking as one
Experiencing, feeding as one
A thick rich soup
Which can’t be canned or bottled

Healthy skin is thick and flexible
Healthy breath is deep and lusty
Our healthy body does not need
Limiting power,
Doesn’t need to hold in,
To hold back,
To die from not dancing,
Not risking,
Not feeling pain, joy, pleasure
Deeply
Just dying slowly
Within the tight shallow
Owning MY SPACE

And they laugh in the gun towers!

“Scape”, digital painting by Frank Moore, 1998

Life has the potential of both fear and strength

Excerpt from Frank Moore’s book, Cherotic Magic Revised, Chapter 4 “Reality Shaping” (Section 18)


Most people feel the possibility of fear and doubt within an event or situation and believe it is them fearing and doubting. By doing so, they take the fear and doubt onto themselves, making the fear and doubt their own. This transforms, transmutes, the event or situation from just life into a terrible monster of which the person is a victim. Left unchecked, this fear or doubt will leak into the person’s whole personal reality, making parts of herself victims and other parts monsters. But this is not the end of it. Other people become monsters or victims as fear and doubt leaks out from the personal reality into the general reality of the cultural frame. By taking on fear and doubt, by making it her own, the person is taking on the responsibility of the universal doubt and fear. This is because she becomes a transmitter of doubt and fear. She amplifies the doubt and fear in the world. The more she believes doubt and fear is himself, the louder and the wider the broadcast.

Fortunately, this entire process is also true when a person operates from, sees, chooses, and uses the positive, the strength, the power, the freedom in a situation or an event. The student should understand that every situation in life has the potential of both fear and strength, of both doubt and power, of both desire and freedom. This background of potential is always there within life. The choice is always there. In the western modern culture, doubt, fear, and desire are actively promoted because victims are easier to control and manipulate than free humans.

For this reason we will always feel doubt, fear, and desire around us in this society. But we are not responsible for doubt, fear, desire unless we choose to take them on as our own, as us. But once we choose to take these negatives on as our own, to think and act upon them, then we are taking on the guilty responsibility for them not only in our lives, but in the world in general.

But if we brush past the fears, the doubts, and the desires to lustfully take on life as our own, make it our own with all of its strength, power, and freedom, then we assume the responsibility (in all of the senses of that word) for life, strength, power, and freedom. We do this not only for ourselves, but for everyone. The more life, freedom, strength, and power is chosen, the more available these are for everyone.

This has been called the way of the warrior. It is the way of the shaman. But it is also the way of living happily. We have to always push past the ever-present doubt and fear to lustfully join with life, lustfully work with life, working with everything life gives us, including what would look to victims as hardships and sufferings. By doing this, we crack over time the shell of “hardships”, finding these life experiences transformed into deep living blessings.


Artwork by LaBash from Cherotic Magic Revised

Zappa Liking It Wasn’t Enough

From the book HOW TO HANDLE AN ANTHROPOLOGIST: Russell Shuttleworth, PhD interviews shaman/performance artist Frank Moore


Session 51, January 27, 2003

Russell: We were talking about the band, getting the band together. We talked a little bit about some of the performances you did.
Frank: Did you watch …
Russell: I completely forgot to check it out! Sorry. I will write a note.
Frank: Tell me about it! Like us!
(Russell talks about all that he has going on right now)
Frank: When the OBR hit, all of the sudden we were going two nights a week and the workshop on Sundays and pairings.
Russell: Yeah, it sounds like you were busy then too. It takes some adjusting.
Frank: Not to mention doing the sessions.
Russell: Yeah, I was tending to grumble that I didn’t have much time before, but sometimes you realize how frivolous you were with your time before when you really start getting busy. And I realized, I was wasting a lot of time before and I didn’t think I was. Suddenly, you’re doing three times as much and you’re still doing it. So anyway, I will look at it next time!
Frank: That was why I did not tell what acts we were doing until we got there.
Russell: If you want to pick up some other aspect that was going on in your life either at that time or some other themes, we could get back to that after I watch it this time. If you don’t want to get into it.
Frank: Not really.
Russell: OK. Then I can just do it in retrospect. I think you’re ready, huh?
Frank: They had to be prepared to do any of the acts.
Russell: And prepared meant what?
Frank: Bring the costumes and props.
Russell: OK.
Frank: I wrote the list of acts the day of the show.
Russell: It was just what you happened to feel would be good that particular time.
Frank: (makes “yes” sound) I kept experimenting with the order and we kept adding new acts all the time. So it never was the same.
Russell: Always something different.
Frank: Debbie painted the backdrop. It was like a carnival show.
Russell: Sounds great.
Frank: It was on one side of the stage and on the back wall but people could see us waiting to go on on the side.
Russell: So people in the audience could see you getting ready to go on. OK. So you were giving them a little bit of backstage view.
Frank: (makes “yes” sound) Like we crips could not use the dressing room.
Russell: Why?
Frank: It was upstairs.
Russell: (laughs) Not accessible.
Frank: So, we changed on the side of the stage. They hosed Hoffman down after his act. (laughs)
Russell: (laughs) Got a little messy.
Frank: On the side of the stage. (laughs)
Russell: So people could see it? (laughs)
Frank: (makes “yes” sounds)
Russell: That was very tantalizing.
Frank: So the show was not just what was on the stage.
Russell: How were your crew about that?
Frank: That is just how it was.
Russell: What about the audience? Did they like it do you think?
Frank: Yes. Because there were a lot of fast changes.
Russell: Oh yeah, OK. So there were changes going on a lot of the time?
Frank: I mean costume changes.
Russell: Yeah, that’s what I meant too. So there were a lot of costume changes going on from what I understand.
Frank: (makes “yes” sound)
Russell: So there would be something going on on stage and somebody changing at the same time sometimes?
Frank: (makes “yes” sound)
Russell: How interesting. Sounds like fun.
Frank: When we got there we only had a half hour to set up and less to tear down.
Russell: Wow. Under time constraints. But you did it.
Frank: Yes.
Russell: So, how long did the performances last for?
Frank: The regular show, one hour.
Russell: That’s a good time.
Frank: The Anniversary show, three hours.
Russell: Three hours! What constitutes the Anniversary show? When did you do the Anniversary show?
Frank: We did it for three, almost four years.
Russell: So each year you’d have one big Anniversary show?
Frank: (makes “yes” sound)
Russell: Wow! What about the last show?
Frank: That was at the Art Institute. The sound did not work.
Russell: When?
Frank: At the Art Institute.
Russell: So how did you handle that?
Frank: People in the audience loved it, but the cast was looking for (laughs) any excuse to kill the show.
Russell: The cast?! That wonderful, dedicated cast?!
Frank: They called me to say why that was it. (laughs)
Russell: What did you say?
Frank: It was hard trying to get them to see what we were doing.
Russell: But didn’t they just love performing?
Frank: They never saw …
Russell: The larger picture?
Frank: (makes “yes” sound) Like they always saw the Mab as a dive.
Russell: And it wasn’t.
Frank: They always saw the show as bad. Just what we did.
Russell: What was their motivation for doing it then?
Frank: A good question.
Russell: (laughs)
Frank: They liked to get on stage. Or some did.
Russell: Just liked to ham it up. They didn’t have a sense of the larger picture of what they were doing.
Frank: Ami and Mariah wanted to be rock stars. Diane wanted to be in theater.
Russell: They had aspirations. Did any of them, after the OBR closed, go on to do stuff?
Frank: Ami tried, and years later I ran into her. She said she now knows what I was talking about. She got a technically great band that went nowhere and was not fun.
Russell: She was a member of a band that was technically good, but it wasn’t any fun?
Frank: (makes “yes” sound) So she does real estate.
Russell: You mean sell houses and land stuff. Sounds boring.
Frank: Catherine got into a band as the girl.
Russell: Lead singer?
Frank: You know bands that have the girl just for marketing.
Russell: Yeah.
Frank: We went to see them. It was sad. She tried to sing one of our songs, “Beaver”. But without the context of the OBR
Russell: It didn’t work.
Frank: She got shit from the audience.
Russell: They weren’t expecting it, whereas your audience was.
Frank: Sleazy.
Russell: It was out of the right context. Context is everything.
Frank: Or was all about new, creating a new context.
Russell: About creating a new context.
Frank: (makes “yes” sound)
Russell: OK.
Frank: So when she did not have that context …
Russell: Right. What did she think? Did she know it after she tried it?
Frank: I don’t think she understood.
Russell: That’s a shame. Things can have radically different effects on things.
Frank: Most of them still think it was trash.
Russell: Think of it as trash?
Frank: (makes “yes” sound)
Russell: Do you think it was one of the best things you did now? I get the sense that you enjoyed that.
Frank: On every level.
Russell: Yeah, it worked on every level.
Frank: Most artists would kill to get that fortunate opportunity. We had the Mab to do anything we wanted.
Russell: So you had a venue all of the time.
Frank: Which was one of the three top punk clubs in the country. All the top bands.
Russell: Yeah.
Frank: All the cutting-edge artists.
Russell: Yeah. Prime location.
Frank: Dirk was ready to walk when the owner said we had to go.
Russell: Wow.
Frank: We had people like Zappa say, “Love the show.” (laughs) We had worldwide press.
Russell: So that was pretty much of an impact.
Frank: They said Zappa must have been kidding.
Russell: Who said that?
Frank: The cast. (loud sounds) Robert Fripp liked the band.
Russell: Yeah, well these guys are pretty heavy duty avant-garde musicians. Fripp is definitely out there.
Frank: They did not believe him. (laughs)
Russell: Wow. He’s actually the guy who didn’t lay any wax!
Frank: And I explained it.
Russell: Simple! They were stupid. I have no idea.
Frank: (laughs)
Russell: They had expectations about what constituted good or excellent.
Frank: They thought it was not real theater or music.
Russell: Right. They had expectations about what real theater and music is. So, that’s a shame for them. Because they had a hit and they didn’t realize it.
Frank: So they don’t get it is history.
Russell: Yeah, right. What about Hoffman, was he the same way?
Frank: Like he wanted to be mainstream political.
Russell: You’re talking about him personally?
Frank: (makes “yes” sound) So even though he took his acts with respect, he thought it was something to distance himself from.
Russell: When you say he took his acts with respect, what do you mean by that?
Frank: He was a perfectionist.
Russell: OK. So he wanted to distance himself from his acts?
Frank: From the OBR.
Russell: At the time or later or both?
Frank: During.
Russell: How did he do that?
Frank: Not tell …
Russell: People that he was in it?
Frank: (makes “yes” sound)
Russell: Because he was afraid of being shunned by the mainstream?
Frank: Yeah.
Russell: So he may have been having fun but he did not want to own up to it in case it tarnished his reputation in the mainstream.
Frank: (makes “yes” sound) In the closet.
Russell: (laughs) OK. Did he maintain that throughout … that kind of attitude?
Frank: (makes “yes” sound) Which is silly.
Russell: (laughs) Why?
Frank: Because history … he was one of the first disabled performance artists.
Russell: Does he cop to that now?
Frank: You would know better than me.
Russell: (laughs) I’m just seeing if you would answer. (laughs) I can be sneaky.
Frank: He jumped around on his knees and had big bruises on his knees.
Russell: So he had the war warts. I think he cops to it and looks on it fondly.
Frank: Do you see the history?
Russell: Yeah. I know what you’re talking about. And I think he glimpses it at this point with respect. But he had a conflict of mainstream/avant-garde, or whatever you want to call it, in him. He walks that tightrope. So sometimes he goes one way or the other too. (laughs) But a lot of people don’t like that kind of thing. And a lot of people don’t even go as far as him. He seems to have or tried to apply some of the stuff you were doing at the time in his life since then, which … that’s good. That there’s still an effect all of those years later. You lived it. That’s you. But he walks that tightrope so, and yet he still gives it its credence, tries to keep it there.
Frank: He banned me from the CP Center.
Russell: (laughs) Why? He thought you had this bad influence? Corrupting?
Frank: (makes “yes” sound) A drama teacher had me show my movie there.
Russell: Fairytales?
Frank: Yes. Did I tell you before?
Russell: Yeah, I think so. But it’s still funny.
Frank: They were adults, most were less disabled than me. But they are warehoused.
Russell: Yeah.
Frank: Most don’t talk.
Russell: I know. I’ve been up there and I’ve seen it. I used to go up there with my friend and we always had the discussion afterwards of how many of them were cognitively impaired and how many of them were just starved and had not been given the opportunity, were just socialized into being that way.
Frank: Exactly.
Russell: Yeah. It’s kind of scary. You come away feeling … it’s sort of a weird, morbid thing.
Frank: When they were watching my movie … (Frank emotes enthusiastically)
Russell: They were responding?
Frank: They were singing.
Russell: (laughs) You got through to them. You broke through to the other side, as Jim Morrison says.
Frank: Afterwards they talked. They wanted to date. They wanted to risk. “My sister don’t want me to get hurt. I don’t care. I am willing to get hurt if that is what it takes.” (screams)
Russell: (laughs) You shook it up, you shook up the old pot.
Frank: Does that sound like mental?
Russell: No.
Frank: The teacher was excited. He did not understand his job. He thought it was to get them into life. (screams) So he invited me back. (laughs)
Russell: So was that when Hoffman stepped in?
Frank: After a few days the teacher called me. The Director said, “No way.” It took a lot to calm the clients back down.
Russell: Oh yeah. And was the director Hoffman?
Frank: Yes. Of course, his ex-wife is in it.
Russell: What do you mean?
Frank: In Fairytales.
Russell: So did you guys ever talk about that later?
Frank: No. I don’t think I have seen him since then.
Russell: When was that?
Frank: I did not see him then.
Russell: Oh, he just sent word.
Frank: The late 1980s.
Russell: He just sent word, he didn’t tell you himself?
Frank: Yes.
Russell: He didn’t want to confront you.
Frank: Dangerous.
Russell: Yeah. He didn’t want to chance anything.
Frank: Give them hope.
Russell: So, what was he doing there? (laughs)
Frank: Warehousing.
Russell: Yeah. It’s always been curious to me. And if I hadn’t encountered some barriers up there, I might have interviewed men from there instead of in the community and had gotten a much different view. Because a lot of the barriers that exist for those … like that’s a barrier right there.
Frank: They are not allowed sex.
Russell: Well, yeah. Every once in a while they will let someone come in and talk about it, but when, with the support of several staff, my study got close, the Director put a stop to it for a couple months until all of this business was taken care of. He wanted to meet with me in a couple months and I didn’t want to hang around for a couple months waiting, so I just went with my other alternative. But I heard from one of the staff members, there was a history there where some staff member had been caught masturbating one of the men there and had gotten fired. And that that was what the history that was there was why they were really wary. (laughs) But, I don’t know the circumstances about that, but I can imagine. That kind of thing is not necessarily taboo to me, but institutions like that have to protect their whatever they’re trying to protect. Their good name, legal shit.
Frank: They are prisons.
Russell: Yeah. But even though a lot of those guys get to go home to group homes, a lot of them, they just come back there the next day. Group homes probably are just as much of a prison because … It’s really kind of a shame that somebody is not brave enough, it’s not necessarily brave enough, but you have to be able to get through the barriers, the gatekeepers yourself, to segue and expose that situation. Someday somebody will.

For order information and much more visit the website: http://www.eroplay.com/hthaa/

Visit the The Outrageous Beauty Revue website.

Credit Card Morality

As published in Frankly Speaking: A Collection of Essays, Writings & Rants by Frank Moore. Excerpted from Cherotic Magic Revised by Frank Moore, July 1998.

Do to others as you would want to be done to you. Treat people as yourself. Love your neighbor, your enemy, others as yourself. You will reap what you sow. The law of karma. These are all nice abstractions with the loopholes of individualistic choice and time built into them. That is, they secretly imply that there is a choice about seeing the other as separate from yourself, from your personal body…imply that there is a karmic credit card on which you can in effect charge “wrong” action to be paid, with a certain rate of interest, in either good works or suffering at a later date. This creates a judging, an evaluating, a choosing, a questioning whether a “wrong” action is worth the charge on the credit card, how it affects your credit rating. Worst yet, it, like the bank’s Mastercard, tends to hide the real costs of the “wrong” actions, hiding it within the easy payment plan, hiding the wide-ranging resulting effects of the “wrong” actions.

“Wrong” actions are different both from mistakes and from “bad” action in a morality system. Mistakes are learning tools within life’s evolution. Mistakes are vital, unavoidable, and vulnerable because true mistakes are the result of creative risk-taking. A “mistake” that is repeated over and over is not a mistake at all, but a “wrong” action. A wrong action is an action which harms, does not promote life-affirmations…it is in fact a life-denial, broadcasting life-denials. Morality is an itemized list from the moral visa card…a list of all the possible sins and the form of payment required for each sin. But nowhere on this list is there any mention of the real results, both personal and dynamic, of the so-called sin.

This moral/karmic easy payment plan is one of the main means by which the life-denying power-combine abstracts us out of the direct involving experience of life. It puts the results outside of the personal present into an impersonal future. It puts the “payment” result of a sin outside of the personal present into both an impersonal past and impersonal future…that is, in a moral system of payment. You are paying for past sins in the future. This is fragmenting the reality of experience. A credit card makes it much harder to experience the reality of buying something because it fragments the exchange, the relationship, between two people. There is no exchange of what/who you are in the present. So it is very much harder to feel, experience, the real worth or result of the buying experience. It is much harder to feel, experience who you really are. So you spend more than you would if it had been a physical exchange, a physical relationship, between you and another person. Moreover, the medium of the exchange, money, has been abstracted into unreality, put outside the personal reality. This makes spending casually a matter of course. Creating this casualness is a main reason for credit cards, poker chips, and sins.

But the abstraction does not end at the purchase experience. Without the context of the relationship of exchange, the actual experience of the result of the exchange…for example, the concert which the ticket is for…takes on an unreality to it. Moreover, when it comes time to pay, the experience of the concert has long ago happened, faded into the past. The payment is no longer a personal physical involvement in the actual experience of the concert. The payment is now an involvement with the abstraction, the power system, of the credit card. This involvement with the abstraction is the concept of duty, “should” duty. Because the experience of the concert has been long ago made over into an abstraction before payment time, it is difficult to feel the real effect of the concert. So you dutifully, casually pay the credit card bill.

This basic credit card dynamic is at the root of all moral systems. All moral systems are systems of power, of abstraction, of fragmentation. A moral system contains a framework of shoulds, should nots, taboos. This moral framework is substituted for the direct experience of life. The reasons for the shoulds, should nots, and taboos are not revealed or explained. Love thy neighbor. Thou shall not kill. But there is not a real sense of why. This is true of the modern anti-moral systems of “going with the flow” and “do your own thing”…these anti-moral systems are just moral systems dressed up in mirrors. The should/taboo framework is a con for power.

A saint takes on a moral system so completely that he becomes the social system. Living within a moral framework as a saint does limits the personal ability to shape reality, hence transferring this ability in the form of power to the abstract social structure.

But a life of a saint is not the real goal of any moral system. If everybody lived as saints, the power that was thus generated would not be anywhere near enough to keep an abstract structure in existence. This is why real saints are always in a very tiny minority or a false myth. Saints are decoy models projected in front of people by the abstract power structure.

The real goal of any moral system is personal failure. This type of failure is different from the failure within evolution or creativity. It is the failure of a victim or a loser. A moral system is set up to be almost impossible, if not in fact impossible, for humans to live within. At the heart of the con of morality is to convince the people that they should do what they are not empowered to do. Convince them by creating a system of rewards and punishments which is based on the fragmentation of time into past and future. Once a person is plugged into this reward/punishment system, he stops shaping his actions by the concrete experience of the results, both linear and nonlinear, of his actions. Instead, he starts focusing on the rewards and punishments within the moral system…starts focusing on the past and/or future…starts doing/not doing based on the promised reward/punishment. This abstracts the person out of the direct present experience of his life action and its resulting effects. This abstraction is the root cause of personal casualness. Once he is thus abstracted out of the direct experience, he can be sold whatever prepackaged pictures of reality that the abstract power structures issue, will pay whatever price for forgiveness, protection, for a piece of power (no matter how small). In this way, the person is convinced by the power structure that he needs it, needs to belong to it, to conform to its prepackaged deck of pictures of reality.

Our modern social world is made up of the combine of moral systems. Each power system…be it political, religious, social, economical, or sexual…issues its own deck of reality pictures and moral credit cards. This moral combine includes power systems that we do not usually think of as moral systems. What I am thinking of are the systems of romance, glamour, and education. A moral system is a system that abstracts reality into mental pictures into the past/future.

Love others as yourself. Why? If you do, you will be rewarded sometime in the future. If you do, you will be paying back for something bad you did sometime in the past…or, for that matter, for something bad you will do in the future. This is the logic of morals. It is individualistic ego-centered. It abstracts your dynamic relationship with the other out of reality.

Deep love can be defined as: treat the other as yourself, love the other as yourself, because the other is in fact yourself, is part of your body. So what you do to/with/for the other, you are doing to yourself within the point of action of now. Deep love goes back to the pre-shamanistic personal awareness of the land, the plants and animals, the others in the tribe, and in fact the whole physical existence as parts of the personal body, and hence within personal responsibility.

Art by LaBash from Cherotic Magic Revised

I HATE NICE PEOPLE

by Frank Moore, Thursday, April 11, 2002

i get worried if my words and images fit through veins clogged with fatty taboos of polite appropriate of comfortability.

i get worried…is the art that small that it fits through that pinhole of a hole…so small that nudes on the walls, words on telephone poles, any shift in the social power structure threatens the very reality fabric.

i’m too proud to admit the art poetry is that small. so my art becomes a 
roto-rooting balloon covered in razors tipped in draino acid, pushing pressuring uncomfortable unsocial grinding against the grain until the killer fatty clots of taboos burst out the other end and go down the drain like trouble.

i don’t really go after the hitlers, the mccarthys, the helms, or their 
brown shirts.

they are just limp-dicked power-junkies with swiss-cheese egos, each hole filled with inferiority. they are just moons with no power light of themselves, just reflecting fear.

no, i go after the nice people who never asked where the trains were going, boxcars filled with people. didn’t have to. only suspected, only heard rumors…after all, the general is a friend. never said, excuse me, i am a jew too, arab too, a jap too, a gay too, i’ve negro blood running in my body, aids too. i’m a commie who took home movies of our nude kids. so better put me on that train too. better put us all on that train. there ain’t no train big enough!

i go after the nice people who keep going to work after seeing their friends missing, after hearing rumors of blacklist and blackball. must write something about that subject to THE TIMES. he used to be such a pleasant fellow…but now he is a whining paranoid…not a sort to have to tea. he is like a wet messy fart. not in my backyard!

yes, i go after nice people. but my time in the belljar is about over. so i’ll leave you with this. what is happening in your backyard is what really matters. so be sure to weed!

“Seated Nude”, oil on canvas, 36” x 36”, 1981 by Frank Moore